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News/Business. Steve Kroft, Lesley Stahl, Scott Pelley. (2012) Jobs and the economy in Asheboro, N.C.; American historical treasures that have gone missing; Jacksonville Jaguars owner Shahid Khan. New. (CC) (Stereo)

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Pelley 29, Pakistan 13, Landau 13, Barry Landau 8, Rosenstein 7, Mr. Landau 7, America 7, China 7, Simon 6, Khan 6, Us 6, Pitts 6, Lahore 5, Asheboro 4, Pat Anderson 4, Berry 4, Advair 4, Jaguars 3, New York City 3, Jacksonville 3,
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  CBS    60 Minutes    News/Business. Steve Kroft, Lesley Stahl, Scott Pelley.   
   (2012) Jobs and the economy in Asheboro, N.C.; American...  

    October 28, 2012
    7:00 - 8:00pm PDT  

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captioning funded by cbs and ford-- built for the road ahead. >> why are we making less? my family can't afford another four years like this. >> pelley: in randolph county, there's no escaping the second election since the great recession. nonstop, the tv promises a better day or warns of a worse one. folks around here have seen a lot of both. ( whistle blowing ) are we headed for recession or recovery? we went to the historic swing state of north carolina to find out. >> simon: the prosecution says you're a con man, a thief. what do you say to that? barry landau pulled off the single largest theft of historic
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artifacts in the united states: thousands of items, including signed documents by george washington, thomas jefferson, francis scott key, and mark twain. and for 20th century buffs... >> one third of a nation... >> simon: ...f.d.r.'s copy of his 1937 inaugural address. all of these were found in landau's apartment? >> all of these documents were seized from mr. landau's apartment in new york city. >> i love you, guy. i love you. >> who has a bigger moustache? hey, there's a good looking woman! >> pitts: shad khan is the newest owner in the national football league. >> i'm jaguars owner shad khan, and i'm all in. >> pitts: his rakish moustache and unflagging optimism have made him a favorite in northern florida, but it's his unique american success story that made him a story for "60 minutes." >> i'm steve kroft. >> i'm leslie stahl. >> i'm bob simon. >> i'm lara logan.
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>> i'm byron pitts. >> i'm scott pelley. those stories tonight on "60 minutes." [ male announcer ] we're all on a journey to financial independence. ♪ whether you're just beginning the journey... ♪ ...starting a family... ♪ ...or entering a new chapter of your life. while the journey is yours, pacific life can help you protect and grow the assets you'll need along the way. to learn how, visit pacificlife.com. pacific life. the power to help you succeed. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory
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>> pelley: this week before the election, there is a lot of arguing about the slowest recovery america has ever seen. we went to north carolina, a state that went for the president last time but is swinging toward mitt romney now. and we found the story of the economy in the death and life of asheboro. asheboro grew up on manufacturing, its factories filled with generations of families who built their town near purgatory mountain. but in 2008, asheboro was named one of america's fastest dying towns.
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the folks there were never going to quit, but they are still struggling. why are we stuck somewhere between recession and recovery? no one better to ask than those who live around purgatory. in randolph county, there's no escaping the second election since the great recession. nonstop, the tv promises a better day or warns of a worse one. folks around here have seen a lot of both. ( whistle blows ) those days start with the signature sound of asheboro at the acme-mccrary textile company. it opened the year that some of its workers helped put a republican in the white house, william howard taft. it was 1909. 103 years later, bill redding runs the place. at its peak, how many employees did you have? >> bill redding: about 2,000. >> pelley: and today? >> redding: 600.
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>> pelley: to see why its so hard to stitch together a recovery, look at the ladies' hosiery business. it's been torn to shreds by cheap imports. redding has kept the mill going two ways: one, a great idea-- he took a chance on a new product, spanx shapewear, which became a sensation. and two, he moved 600 jobs to honduras. the workers who are less-skilled in honduras working for you, how much less are they making than the people who work on this floor? >> redding: uh, considerable. >> pelley: 50%? >> redding: i probably don't want to answer that. >> pelley: okay. but it's a considerable difference? >> redding: oh, yeah. >> pelley: and it's what keeps your business in business? >> redding: that's true. >> pelley: what would've happened if you'd dug in your heels and said, "no, i'm keeping 1,200 jobs in this plant in randolph county?" >> redding: i think we would probably not exist. >> pelley: you don't have to
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look far to see what he means. this mill, in the nearby town of ramseur, was wiped out, with every job gone, a thousand of them. we couldn't help but notice this in the demolition: "please have a safe drive home, we want to see you tomorrow." remember when driving was the biggest threat to workers? when tomorrow didn't come, there was no future for ramseur's main drag. shops shuttered right after the plant, and amelia hill, one of the last hold-outs, will close her diner this coming thursday. >> amelia hill: all the businesses are gone. they've just faded out, moved. i mean, you can't survive. there's no way. there's no surviving. >> pelley: you've been thinking about your retirement, and you've been saving money, i understand, for a long time? >> hill: right. >> pelley: have you been spending some of that savings to keep the doors open? >> hill: i've had to, i sure have. don't want to dig any deeper in
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it. >> pelley: today, the only full- time employees are you and your daughter? >> hill: right. right. >> pelley: you're going to lay off your own daughter? >> hill: i'm going to lay off my own daughter. >> pelley: they turned the bank into a town museum. it's open two days a month, which is more than its neighbors. these were all the people who came to the café and sat at the counter and drank coffee in the afternoon, right. >> hill: right. right. >> pelley: these were your people? >> hill: those were my people. >> pelley: and now, you're one of them. >> hill: and now, i'm one of them. >> pelley: we couldn't find a better example of what's happening to american manufacturing than this plant on a hilltop in randolph county. this used to be a textile plant. they started building it in 1949; they built the last addition on it in 1995. but the plant closed, and now they're tearing half of it down. the manager told us that they just can't find a buyer who has enough employees to need this much space. in the year 2000, there were 17
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million americans who were working in manufacturing. now, there are just over 12 million. that's five million jobs lost in manufacturing in just the last 12 years. but you can also see rising from the debris of the recession is a new economy in asheboro. klaussner furniture was forced to lay off half its workers, lost to chinese imports. now, its holding onto the others by exporting to china. klaussner furniture is expensive in china but, turns out, the growing chinese middle class thinks the "made in america" label is a status symbol. made in america is an advantage for the technimark company, which has created 800 jobs here. it makes plastic products, including iphone covers. they're growing because they can deliver a customer's new product in two weeks when it can take two months to ship the same thing from china.
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up the road in kernersville, even the abandoned tobacco barns are turning a new leaf-- not with one big company moving in, but dozens of new entrepreneurs who are setting up shops. a lot of them were down on their luck and had no choice but to cook up a new idea. >> jenny fulton: i grew up on pickles. my grandmother used to make pickles. we'd... we always had pickles in the house, and i love them. >> pelley: jenny fulton and ashlee furr were laid-off stockbrokers. they poured their savings into miss jenny's pickles. they're in more than 500 stores, some of them in china, and soon to be in mongolia. they like pickles in china? >> fulton: they're in 40 stores, and they're on the shelf... >> pelley: 40 stores in china? >> fulton: yes, sir. beijing, shanghai, kunming, shenzhen. >> pelley: why did you decide to expand into china? >> fulton: well i'll tell you what happened. i said, "ashlee, 2011, we're going to export to one country. i don't care what it is. because 95% of the world lives outside of the united states." >> pelley: to reach them, she
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went to a seminar and heard about the u.s. export-import bank, the government's credit agency for foreign trade. >> fulton: and i sat right behind fred, who's the president of the export-import bank. and so when he got done speaking, i went running outside to the car, because i saw a group of gentlemen standing there. and i said, "who's driving fred?" guy said, "me, chris." i said, "you're my new best friend. get him to eat these pickles before he gets on the plane because i want to export this year." >> pelley: you got some pickles to the driver of the head of the export-import bank? >> fulton: yes, sir. and we exported that year. >> pelley: pretty good trick. >> fulton: you got to think out of the jar, you know? if you're selling pickles, you better be creative. what's made us successful is what's made every american company successful, and that's hard work and not taking "no" for an answer. if somebody tells me "no," scott, i say, "okay, that means timing's not right, but you'll want my pickles." >> pelley: "no" means "go"? >> fulton: it does, at the right time. but, you know, we're not too
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pushy, you know, i... believe it or not. i know you laugh, but... >> pelley: really? ah, well, i'm glad to hear that. >> fulton: what i do is i drip on you, and i don't let you forget me, okay? >> pelley: here, they call that gumption, and it's forced unemployment from 13%, near the highest in the nation, to just about 9.5%. the jobs are coming, just not fast enough. and no family is a better example of that than the berrys. bobby berry lost his factory job three years ago. he's worked here and there, but mostly they've lived on his wife's pay and benefits. sugar berry's been at the same steady job 27 years at a plant that makes wire for steel-belted tires. this month, bobby got a job when the malt-o-meal cereal plant expanded with 50 new workers. the berrys had two paychecks again, until the letter came. this is the letter that you received from the company.
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"this layoff is a result of the company's decision to cease operations at the asheboro wire plant, which will result in the closure of the entire plant and the termination of the employment of substantially all of the plant's employees, approximately 310." when you read those words, what did you think? >> sugar berry: it can't be. i... i said it couldn't happen whenever we were sold, but i guess i should have expected it coming. >> pelley: they were sold to a korean firm. the jobs may be headed to vietnam. so, one step forward, one step back. >> sugar berry: uh-huh. >> pelley: it seems like the rest of the country. >> sugar berry: yeah. >> bobby berry: yeah. >> pelley: what's that last day going to be like? you worked there nearly 30 years. >> sugar berry: i just don't know. some of those people, i'll
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probably never see again, and we've been together all these years, raised our families together, and cut up together and been mad at each other. and, you know, i don't know. i don't want it to come. ( laughs ) >> pelley: not long ago, their son matt might've followed them into a plant. but instead, he's at randolph community college learning high- tech manufacturing. many of his classmates are in their 30s and 40s. some of them can thank the government for recent increases in tuition assistance, and others in the county have survived on extended unemployment benefits. but with election day coming, many have lost patience with predictions of a recovery they don't quite see. when you see those ads, what do you think? >> bobby berry: i just lost confidence in all of them, to tell you the truth. i mean, you know, they'll make these promises around election time, and then it seems like,
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you know, after it's over with, nothing. so, you know, i don't even know if i'll vote. >> pelley: sugar, what do you think? >> sugar berry: it shouldn't be that we're trying to one-up either side. it should be that we're working together for the american people. and you have not seen that at all. whoever's got something on the floor, the other's going to do whatever they can do to veto it or be against it, instead of doing what's right for the american people. >> pelley: around purgatory mountain, jobs lost by the thousands are being reinvented by the hundreds. there is considerable doubt that another election will do very much about that. folks around here believe that, if there is to be a brighter tomorrow, they'll have to build it themselves.
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>> simon: american history is housed in the national archives- - 44 of them, spread all over the country. they contain documents, photos, maps, artifacts that go back to our founding fathers. every school kid knows about some of them-- the declaration of independence, the constitution, the bill of rights. but there are millions of others, from the patent for michael jackson's moonwalking shoes to benedict arnold's
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loyalty oath. many are priceless treasures, which means they attract not only scholars but thieves, more and more of them all the time. getting to the crooks before they get to the archives has become a new priority in law enforcement. no one knows more about this than barry landau, a self- described presidential historian and one of the foremost collectors of presidential memorabilia. that's because barry landau carried out the largest theft of these treasures in american history. prosecutors say he is one of the most accomplished con men they have ever encountered. for decades, he was a regular guest at the white house. here he is with president ford and queen elizabeth. he's the guy with the beard. >> president ronald reagan: well... ( laughter ) >> simon: he showed up with president reagan and nancy at the inaugural gala in 1985, and met a whole bunch of presidents-
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- richard nixon, george h.w. bush, bill clinton. he wrote an impressive, picture- laden book, "the president's table." and was invited to the finest anchor desks in town. >> barry h. landau is presidential historian... >> the story of the ultimate inauguration collector... >> simon: but when we met up with him in june, he no longer wanted to tell his story. he'd been convicted of the single largest theft of historic artifacts in the united states. he stole thousands of items, including hundreds of documents, signed by some of the most famous names in history-- george washington, thomas jefferson, francis scott key, marie antoinette, and voltaire. he'd pilfered them from museums and libraries all over the country. u.s. attorney rod rosenstein was in charge of the prosecution. he was a con man? >> rod rosenstein: barry landau was a con artist. and he used his reputation as a
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presidential historian in order to gain the confidence of museums and other people who had custody of important documents. and then he stole them. it was a reputation, it turns out, that was the product of his rich imagination. landau claimed he'd worked for every president since lyndon johnson, had served as chief of protocol at the white house. >> rosenstein: but in fact, there is no evidence that barry landau was ever employed by any white house, or had any of the relationships he claimed to have, or indeed had any legitimate job at all. >> simon: the landau case, and a few others, let law enforcement know they had a problem they hadn't really been aware of until very recently. >> paul brachfeld: every institution now that has collections is threatened. we all know that there is a major threat and it's getting larger. >> simon: former secret service employee paul brachfeld is the inspector general of the national archives. he runs the tiny and little- known archival recovery team--
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armed federal agents and historians who, along with the fbi, go after stolen national treasures. now, landau, was he a good thief? was he a good con man? >> brachfeld: from everybody i talked to, he was a master thief. because he did it over a duration of time. he shopped. he got what he shopped for. >> pelley: a trusted researcher and regular at libraries around the country, landau's strategy, along with his accomplice, they conquered with kindness, as they did here at the maryland historical society, where pat anderson is the director. some thieves work with knives, others with guns. these guys worked with cupcakes. >> pat anderson: yes, they did. yes, they did. they brought us cupcakes, and the second time they visited, they brought cookies. evidently, they took treats to every repository they visited. >> simon: and it worked. >> anderson: it did work.
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>> simon: but on july 9 last year, the esteemed mr. landau got careless, and pat anderson's archivists got suspicious, caught them stealing, and called the police. how many things did they have when they were caught? >> anderson: they had 60 pieces of our library material. >> simon: okay, now, this is some of the stuff they stole? tell me what we're looking at. >> anderson: there are inauguration souvenirs. >> simon: from which inauguration? >> anderson: this is grover cleveland's. and these are fun-- tickets to andrew johnson's impeachment trial in the u.s. senate. and they grabbed a fistful of those. >> simon: i bet. there wasn't much security at the maryland historical society. but still, how do you walk out in front of the librarians' desk with 60 documents? the secret was sartorial-- deep pockets. and those are his costumes? >> rosenstein: these are the jackets that mr. landau used,
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and he had altered in order to steal items from the historical societies. now, what's interesting about these coats is that he arranged for a tailor to install interior pockets, hidden pockets inside the jackets that are large enough to fit these documents. >> simon: landau had a whole collection of them, including a trench coat. how did you react when you saw his jackets? >> brachfeld: fascinated. again, in my world, every criminal is different, every thief is different. and you just always... you kind of respect them. you kind of learn from them. >> simon: after the bust in maryland, inspector general brachfeld and the fbi decided it would be a good idea to get a search warrant for landau's apartment in new york. it was your agents who broke into landau's apartment. how did they react when they found what they found? >> brachfeld: well, my focus was getting them a truck, because when we got to mr. landau's
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apartment, we came to the quick realization that we needed a truck. this was, by far, in terms of quantity, the largest amount of documents and artifacts that we've ever recovered from one site. >> simon: 10,000 items, including 300 of extraordinary historical value. what were they worth on the market? >> brachfeld: i think the value was astronomical. and for me, it's so difficult to put an empirical number on them. it's basically how much the market would bear. for all i know, to some collector, one document might have been worth millions. >> simon: all of these were found in landau's apartment? >> rosenstein: all of these documents were seized from mr. landau's apartment in new york city. >> simon: there were remarkable documents-- letters signed by mark twain, sir isaac newton, charles dickens; a document penned by lorenzo de medici 533 years ago; an epitaph written by benjamin franklin for himself... and he wrote, "lies here food for the worms, yet the work
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shall not be lost." pretty good stuff. ...a letter written by john hancock with a real john hancock signature. and for 20th century buffs, there was the original reading copy of fdr's 1937 inaugural address-- this one... >> president franklin roosevelt: one third of a nation, ill housed, ill clad, ill nourished... >> rosenstein: it was a rainy day. in fact, the reading copy of the speech, the document the president read from that day was waterlogged. and you can see that on the document that we seized from mr. landau. >> simon: and landau didn't just steal from historical libraries. he had taken his campaign of kindness all the way to the white house, befriending president clinton's former secretary, betty currie, who made the mistake of inviting landau to her house. landau was pretty good at making friends with people who could
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help him, wasn't he? he spent nights at her place. >> brachfeld: bad, bad offer to invite him into your house. >> simon: he arrived at her house with one suitcase and left with two. >> brachfeld: the assistant u.s. attorney actually upped that. i think he said it was three in court. so betty currie should've gotten up early that morning and basically escorted him out the door. i guess there's a lesson to be learned-- if you have a houseguest, say good-bye to them in your driveway. >> simon: he robbed her of more than 250 items, including copies of presidential speeches from her personal collection. naturally, we wanted to ask barry landau about all of this, so this summer, we tried to talk to him in new york city. bob simon, "60 minutes." talk to us a minute. >> barry landau: no, no, no, no, no. >> simon: just answer some questions. it's... you're being accused of a lot of things and we want to hear your side of it. they say... the prosecution says
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you're a con man, a thief. what do you say to that? don't you have anything to say at this point in your own defense? landau may have been the maestro of his craft, but there have been others thieves. this summer, prosecutors put leslie waffen behind bars. he was in charge of the archives' audio and film records department. he stole thousands of original recordings and sold them on ebay, gems like this eyewitness account of the hindenburg disaster. >> it's a terrific crash, ladies and gentlemen. the smoke and the flames. oh, the humanity! >> simon: another employee stole most of the presidential pardons from the philadelphia archives, as well as hundreds of photos taken by astronauts in space and on the moon. do you look on ebay for suspicious documents? >> brachfeld: that would be one of the sites we would look at. many times, when a thief is trying to move a document on the internet, the buyer may be a federal agent.
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and that's real sweet. >> simon: you're talking sting operations? >> brachfeld: yes. >> simon: have you been successful with sting operations? >> brachfeld: yes. we ask our sentinels, historians and collectors and dealers, to help us. we go where a lot of federal employees usually aren't welcome. we'll go to gun shows, we'll go to dealer shows. >> simon: like the civil war collector's fair in gettysburg, pennsylvania. here, hundreds of dealers and thousands of visitors show up every year to meander and to buy. many documents, including a few signed by ulysses grant and robert e. lee are for sale. have any of them been stolen from archives or museums? that's what archival recovery team agents kelly maltagliati and mitch yockelson are looking for. what would you be happiest to find? >> mitch yockelson: we're missing the wright brothers' patent. that would thrill me to no end to recover the patent for the
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flying machine of 1903. >> simon: when did it disappear? >> yockelson: we don't even know. we discovered it was missing around 2003 when a staff member had wanted to pull it for an exhibit commemorating the centennial. >> simon: also missing, the bombing maps of hiroshima and nagasaki. so where do these things end up? >> rosenstein: in foreign countries. for example, in eastern europe, there is a market-- a black market-- for american historical documents. >> simon: how do these black markets function and where are they? >> rosenstein: i think it's like any illegal market anywhere in the world. if you know of somebody who has a lot of money and wants to collect significant, unique items and you make that connection, then you may well be able to make the sale. >> simon: but barry landau has been put out of business. this summer, he was sentenced to seven years in prison. and that's not all. >> rosenstein: even after mr. landau is released from prison, he will be prohibited from visiting museums, libraries, or any other places where documents are deposited.
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>> simon: one after effect of the landau case is that security is being tightened in many of these places. pat anderson is imposing new rules in the maryland historical society. >> anderson: our patrons are no longer allowed to wear jackets in the reading room. and it's unfortunate-- some of our older patrons, they get chilly, and we have to say "i'm sorry" and... so they can wear a shawl but they can't wear jackets, so... ( laughs ) >> simon: you're going to have to hand out blankets. >> anderson: well, exactly and hope that they don't have pockets in them. >> simon: yeah. and ms. anderson will not just be hoping. she'll be there on the front lines guarding our past. you are the custodians of more than these documents; you're sort of the custodians of american history. >> anderson: yes, we are. we're the stewards. we make sure it gets from one generation to the next. this is what survives of the american past. we never have all of it, which is what makes what survives so
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much more important. these things don't belong to us. they belong to the american people. >> simon: after we finished reporting this story, longtime inspector general paul brachfeld was put on administrative leave with pay, in part, for allegedly leaking sensitive information to "60 minutes." he denies the allegations against him. >> go to 60minutesovertime.com to hear bob simon talk about the surprise interview in this story. sponsored by pfizer. hi, i'm phil mickelson. i've been fortunate to win on golf's biggest stages. but when joint pain and stiffness from psoriatic arthritis hit, even the smallest things became difficult. i finally understood what serious joint pain is like. i talked to my rheumatologist and he prescribed enbrel. enbrel can help relieve pain, stiffness, and stop joint damage. because enbrel, etanercept, suppresses your immune system, it may lower your ability to fight infections.
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>> pitts: last november, shahid khan, a 62-year-old pakistani- born billionaire, bought pro football's jacksonville jaguars for $770 million. the deal made khan the first ethnic minority to own a team in the nfl. and that may be the least interesting thing about him. with his engaging personality and unflagging optimism, khan has taken the city of jacksonville, florida, by storm. he's become the town's leading cheerleader, and has plans to turn the jaguars into an international brand. "shad," as he prefers to be called, came to the u.s. at age
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16 with $500 to his name. within two decades, he built a successful auto parts business and amassed a fortune. the jaguars haven't had a winning season in four years and have never been to the super bowl. they are also a team short on big-name players. and that's put shad khan in a unique position for a rookie owner. he is the face of the franchise. >> i love you, guy. i love you! >> shahid khan: who has the bigger mustache? hey, there's as good-looking woman! >> pitts: 90 minutes to kickoff, and the jaguars' most popular personality wasn't in the locker room or warming up on the field. he was in the stadium parking lot, drawing a crowd. >> khan: so, byron, it's probably a really humbling day for "60 minutes." you know, nobody cares about "60 minutes." everybody cares about the jaguars. isn't that amazing? >> pitts: less than a year into his tenure, shad khan is a phenomenon. his rakish mustache has become a "must have" accessory for any self-respecting jags fan.
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>> we are so happy that you're here with us! >> khan: oh, thank you so much. >> pitts: he has an approval rating any politician would envy, 78%. he's his team's advertising spokesman... >> khan: i'm jaguars owner shad khan, and i'm all in. >> pitts: ...and pokes fun at himself in this music video spoof. >> khan: ooh-pah! gangnam style! >> pitts: there's a part of you that is a salesman. >> khan: i think it's human interaction. i mean, they're already here, they bought tickets, there's very little to sell. if anything, selling hope. >> are we going to cover the spread? ( laughter ) >> khan: i don't even know what it is. thank you. >> pitts: while khan enjoys rock star status today, news that a muslim from pakistan had bought the jaguars did not go over well with everyone in this conservative corner of northeast florida.
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in comments quoted in online media, khan was called, among other things a "terrorist from pakistan," a "sand monkey." one person asked, "if you buy a jags season ticket, does it come with a prayer rug?" how'd you react to that? >> khan: ah, well, you know, the way i reacted most of my life, which is it's not really my problem; it's their problem. it was not jacksonville's finest moment. >> pitts: so it's true that the former owner, wayne weaver, was so embarrassed that he offered you a chance to get out of the deal? >> khan: well, please, i wouldn't characterize it that way. i think he was surprised. and he wanted to just make sure that, you know, it wasn't giving me pause. >> pitts: and it gave you none at all? khan: none whatsoever. it was like... as a matter of fact, if it was possible for me
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to be more determined, it, you know, gave me more determination. >> pitts: that determination can be traced back to a childhood half a world away in the hot, dusty streets of lahore, pakistan's second largest city. >> khan: this is the lahore fort. >> pitts: last spring, we went to lahore with khan to visit his family. >> hi! >> pitts: he took us to his boyhood home... >> khan: meet my guest. >> pitts: hello, ma'am. ...where we met his 89-year-old mother, zakia, a retired math professor, and his younger brother, faran, a businessman. how do you explain it? your son, your boy, is one of the richest men in the world. how do you explain that? >> zakia khan: well, it's his hard work. and luck, also. >> faran khan: as his friends say, he always knew about his destiny. he had that entrepreneur, i would say, instincts which made
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him succeed like this. >> pitts: khan's late father, rafiq, sold surveying equipment. he preached humility and frugality and encouraged his son's early business ventures. as a child, khan built and sold radios, and made his friends pay to borrow his comic books. and this is where the future owner of an american pro football team spent many afternoons as a boy, the city's cricket stadium, home to pakistan's national team. >> khan: this is where, you know, the big sports events happen. >> pitts: so this is your yankee stadium, your soldier field? >> khan: absolutely. we would walk over and, you know, get here after tea time so we could walk in free. >> pitts: that was big, because your dad wasn't big on spending money on tickets. >> khan: no, he was not. never bought a ticket ever. ( laughter ) >> pitts: and proud of that? >> khan: and proud of that. ( laughter ) >> pitts: that evening, chatting over tea above lahore's royal
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mosque, we were treated to a regular feature of pakistani life, a cut in power. now, that happens a lot in pakistan, i've noticed. >> khan: yes. >> pitts: when the lights came back on, we talked about coming home. when many people come home, they revel in being at home again. they wax nostalgic about what it means to be back. but you're not that way. why? >> khan: because, oh, my god, i mean, you know, you've been here. see how hard things are? you know, power's going out, it's 108 degrees. it's tough. but i think this is physical things. i think the biggest impediment here is that hope, and you know, getting to the next stage. it doesn't matter how hard you work, there are forces that kind of prevent you from being the best you can be. >> pitts: in january 1967, with $500 in his pocket, shad khan set out for america.
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he was 16 years old. he'd been accepted at the university of illinois in champaign-urbana to study mechanical engineering. he spent his first night at the local ymca. so your room was on this side of the building? >> khan: it was... dormitory, i believe it was this side right here. >> pitts: his room at the "y" set him back just $2. but khan was so afraid of running out of money, he headed out the next morning to find a job. >> khan: got up and walked up on wright street, and they were hiring dishwashers, $1.20 was, "wow, i think i'm going to make it. this is my liberation. i control my destiny and..." >> pitts: a job washing dishes... >> khan: yes. >> pitts: ...would allow you to control your own destiny. >> khan: $1.20 an hour, that's big money. i mean, more than what 99% of the people in pakistan were making. i can control my destiny, i control my life. >> pitts: the teenager from
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pakistan adapted easily to life on the illinois campus. he was invited to join the highly selective and all-white beta theta pi fraternity. why do you think they accepted you? were you a novelty to them? >> khan: i think it was definitely a novelty for them. >> pitts: sure, john smith from cleveland, michael thompson from chicago, and, oh, shahid khan from pakistan. >> khan: exactly. so it was kind of fun for them to see what this is going to turn out to be. >> pitts: it turned out well for khan. through a frat brother, he met fellow student ann carlson. after dating for 11 years as khan built his business, he and ann married at a las vegas wedding chapel. they have two grown children. gets awfully loud in here. >> khan: yeah, it's loud in here. it's the sound of money. >> pitts: shad khan made his fortune in, of all things, truck bumpers. right out of college, he went to work for a small company called flex-n-gate, where he helped
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perfect the first one-piece truck bumper. it was revolutionary, lightweight and didn't rust. khan bought the company in 1980 for $800,000. so, today, you make bumpers for how many different kinds of cars and trucks? >> khan: a lot, a lot. ( laughs ) >> pitts: flex-n-gate parts are on two-thirds of all the cars and trucks sold in america. last year, it had sales of $3.5 billion. and all those bumpers landed khan on the "forbes" list of the 400 richest people in america. >> khan: just keep me posted, and then i think we'll figure out what to do. >> pitts: he has been living the american dream for 45 years and has been a citizen since 1991. but khan's ethnic background has made him a victim of racial profiling. in the aftermath of 9/11, he says, traveling back to the u.s. became a humiliating ordeal. there were endless questions and searches by immigration.
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on one occasion, he was detained while crossing the bridge between canada and detroit. >> khan: got thrown in the brig. >> pitts: thrown in jail? >> khan: well, they had a little holding pen in the bridge. >> pitts: how long were you sitting there? >> khan: maybe five, six hours. but you know what's disturbing is they take your passport, they take the phone, they take everything. so you are just sitting there helpless for hours. >> pitts: you're a successful businessman. you've done nothing wrong. >> khan: yeah, yeah, but you know, it's like their intentions are good. >> pitts: come on, now, you're the most generous man. you're always willing to make excuses for people for the things they do. >> khan: well you know, i got to be honest with you, that's about the only thing that kind of made me a little bit angry. >> pitts: while he enjoys returning to pakistan to see his family, khan says he's concerned by the radical shift in political attitudes there. when we were with you in lahore, one of the shop owners... and we asked him, when did things begin to change in pakistan, and he said... went like this-- "when the long beards took over." >> khan: yeah, yeah, and he's
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absolutely right. i think it's not religion itself. i mean, it's the baggage that comes with it, frankly, that's in the name of religion, people are doing horrible things. >> pitts: and in the pakistan of your youth, you could... whatever your faith was was acceptable. >> khan: absolutely, and not only was it acceptable, it was respected. >> pitts: the man who grew up on cricket in pakistan says his passion for american football began at the university of illinois, cheering on the fighting illini. with financial success came the opportunity to buy into the game at the highest level. khan says he leaves the football side of the business to others, but expects the best from his players. so one of his first moves was to provide them with what's said to be the best locker room in the nfl.
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>> khan: this is about comfort. this is about recognition. this is about setting standards. >> pitts: and in a strategy he hopes will pay dividends for the team and jacksonville, he announced plans for the jaguars to play one home game in london for the next four seasons. but shad khan's biggest challenge will be fielding a more competitive team. >> jacksonville jaguars-- a disaster! >> pitts: the jaguars appear headed for a fifth straight losing season, bad news for a team that's already the least valuable, least popular franchise in the nfl. why did you buy this team? why not buy one of the, for the lack of a better phrasing, marquee nfl teams? >> khan: well, because you buy what's available for sale. so, this isn't like going on craigslist and picking up an nfl team, okay? you know, for me, it's been like fate. it's just like saying, "you know, i'm from pakistan, you are
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16-- why go to champaign-urbana? why not go to new york or go someplace else?" well, because it was champaign- urbana-- it was fate, it was destiny, it was kismet. same thing here. >> hello, everyone. welcome to the cbs sports update presented by e trade. i'm james brown in new york with scores from around the nfl today. atlanta defeated philadelphia 20 advance to 7-0. the giants open a two and a half game lead over dallas. and philadelphia in the n.f.c. east. in london, tom brady fired four touchdowns and the patriots now lead the dolphins by half game in the a.f.c. east. chicago won its fifth straight while green bay and detroit also want to keep pace in the n.f.c. north. for more sports news and information, go to for more sports news and information, go to cbssports.com. go to e-trade. they got killer tools man. they'll help you nail a retirement plan that's fierce. two golden crowns.
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>> pelley: in the mail, comments on our story about the thriving medical marijuana industry in colorado. many focused on the u.s. justice department's restrained response to the state's legalization, regulation and taxation of what is, after all, a serious federal crime. "why is the obama administration's policy for enforcing federal law different in colorado from its harsh enforcement in california? is it because colorado is a swing state?" and then there was this from a substance abuse counselor. "steve kroft did not even attempt to discuss any of the harmful effects of marijuana. there is a lot of evidence today from recent research on the risk of physical addiction to the drug." i'm scott pelley.
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we'll be back next week with another edition of "60 minutes," and i'll see you tomorrow on the "cbs evening news." captioning funded by cbs, and ford-- built for the road ahead. captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org what happened.l me n i was downstairs making coffee, and we heard it. it just came crashing through the roof, out of nowhere. what is it? it's our ira. any idea what coulda caused this? maybe. i just sorta threw a little money here, a little money there. and i loaded up on something my dentist told me was hot. yeah. ♪ it's a rainy morning becoming a caramel drizzle. with folgers gourmet selections, you can turn any day gourmet. new roasts, new flavors, and a new look. i just finished a bowl of your new light chicken pot pie soup
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